Tuesday, October 2, 2007

Monday Night Paddle


Days are getting shorter ... after work I had just enough time to drive to the lake, do 3 or 4 rolls, practice some bow jams, and watch the sunset. The water on Lake Independence is still warm enough for just a wet suit, I expect in the next week or so I will need to start bringing the dry suit.

7 comments:

Adam Bolonsky said...

Hi Ron,
I'm curious as to what a bow jam is. Do you have any photos or descriptions...or is this a whitwater move (cartwheel on the bow)?

Adam

Ron said...

Alex taught me this manouver on Sunday ... it may have some whitewater purpose, and I can't see using it for much more than a party trick. But while underway, placing the paddle into the water at about foot position, against the bow, will turn the boat quickly opposite the side you place the paddle. beware .. tripping over your paddle, its best to be cautious the first time.

Wenley said...

Hi Ron,

Last year I had a discussion over this bow jam. You may want to try to edge the boat as much as you can, away from the turn. The results should improve and the stability feel solid.
What I practice even in rough seas, is the cross bow jam to iniate a very close turn. The turn is very dramatic.
The manoeuvre comes from open canoeing, and it is very well explained as a crossbow jam - not jab- in Gordon Brown's book.

Ron said...

Hi Wenly

I should have been more specific ... what Alex showed me was indeed a crossbow manouver. It is a dramatic turn when done correctly, I'll continue working on it. I did try it edging on both sides, it does feel more stable edging away from the turn.

Rodger said...

I learned this, but it was called a dufeck turn. It was taught as a quick way to turn to avoid a hazard that was seen last minute. Like a submerged rock that you can't see till you are about to hit it.

Adam Bolonsky said...

Hi Ron,
thanks for the clarification and desciptio. I know the move. Out here on the east coast it's simply called a bow rudder.

Kind of like how we call striped bass stripers but mid-Atlantic types call them rockfish.

I agree with Wenley. Key is to edge opposite.

I've seen it used very effectively against breaking waves on the bow or bow quarter. The move swings the kayak perpendicular to the breaking wave pronto.

Some guys also call it the shtoonk.

Adam

Ron said...

Looks like the "Bow Jam" is more than just a party trick. Getting comfortable with the maneuver, and many more for that matter, would be the key to using all our resources. Thanks for the insight guys.